Frequently Asked Questions

Looking for a property

'Furnished' generally means that the home has furniture but does not have bedding or kitchen equipment such as plates and cutlery.   However, in some cases a 'furnished' home will have bedding and kitchen equipment.   Please ask us to clarify for any homes you are interested in.

'Unfurnished' means that you need to supply all furniture and kitchen equipment.

Parking restrictions / allowances vary enormously depending on the property and local borough, and some developments in London are ‘car free’.   As such, you should always ask your letting agent to confirm this before you sign a contract or contact the local borough in person to verify the parking status of the property you are interested in.

Even if you see a property stating it has parking you should always verify this in writing from the agent and make sure this is detailed within the terms of your offer as, sometimes, parking facilities within a development carry additional charges.

Some landlords will accept smoking outside the rented property but not inside.   Other landlords insist that their rented property is only let to non-smokers.   The tenant obligations are detailed in the tenancy agreement which is the legal document that sets out everything about the tenancy, the terms and landlord and tenant obligations.   If in doubt, ask your letting agent to clarify the landlord’s no smoking policy.

No.   All our properties are no smoking and this is stipulated in our tenancy agreements.

Smoking in a property can mean the property can’t be rented to people with sensitivities to smoke, limiting the chance of renting it again.   Also the smell is hard to remove, although reasonably easy to cover up for a short period.   Therefore if we detect there has been smoking in a property then your deposit will be held back for no less than 30 days from the end of your tenancy in order to determine if there are any residual smells and to cover the cost of having these smells removed.

The Holding Deposit is a non-refundable commitment to take up a tenancy at a property on set terms.   With most properties in London receiving multiple offers, this is the only fair way (for tenants and landlords alike) to allocate a tenancy application to a specific tenancy.

When you paid the Holding Deposit and your offer was agreed (subject to references) other offers would have been declined, any viewings cancelled and future viewing requests denied.   As such, if you withdraw, the landlord could be substantially out of pocket.

We will endeavour to return as much of the Holding Deposit to you as possible, however we will first have to hold the funds until we have secured another tenancy for the property.   Your funds will have to cover (if applicable) any delay in start date between your proposed tenancy and the new offer.

If, after these costs have been verified and allocated, there are any funds left these will be returned to you.   However, in the unlikely event that the landlord decides to withdraw from the offer, your Holding Deposit will be returned in full.

Entering a Tenancy Agreement is a serious commitment that is a legally binding financial obligation.   As such, we need to be sure that you are financially capable of meeting the costs of your tenancy as a whole.   It is important that we do so not only to protect the landlord but, if you are taking a joint-tenancy, to ensure that any co-tenants are also suitably protected.

Yes.   Under UK money laundering regulations and Right to Rent legislation we are required to secure copies of valid photo ID (e.g. passport, driving licence, etc.) as well as proof of your current address regardless of whether it is in the UK or abroad.

Once you have found the right property and before you can move in, there are a few costs to take into account to secure a rental property: view tenant fees.

Security deposit

By signing a Tenancy you are making a sizeable contractual agreement to fulfil payment of rent and to also look after the property in a suitable manner.   The Security Deposit is held to offset any breaches that may occur with rent payments and/or damage caused to the property during your tenancy.   We use an independent inventory company in the majority of the rented properties we let to make absolutely sure that when tenancies come to an end there is no disagreement and that the process is fair.

It is worth noting, however, that your liabilities are not limited to the amount of deposit held.

If you rent a home on an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) in England or Wales that started after 6th April 2007 then your landlord must register your deposit with an approved scheme within 14 days.   The scheme will make sure you get your deposit back if you meet the terms of your tenancy agreement, don't damage the property and pay your rent and bills.   At the end of the tenancy your landlord must return the deposit within 10 days of you both agreeing how much you will get back.   If you are in dispute with your landlord then the deposit will be protected in the scheme until the issue has been sorted.

Tenancy agreement

The Tenancy Agreement is a written document agreeing contractual terms between a landlord, tenant and (if applicable) the letting and/or managing agent involved.   It sets out the responsibilities and entitlements of any and all parties therein and is legally binding.

Yes, as a tenant, you are legally required to pay rent until the end of the tenancy agreement or any release clause agreed.   A tenancy agreement is signed by both tenant and landlord and it is legally binding.   As the tenant you need to read it carefully as the duration of the tenancy is stated (the minimum length of time you agree to rent for), how much rent to pay, tenant responsibilities, tenant rights and landlord responsibilities.   In other circumstances, your landlord may agree to end the tenancy earlier, but will expect you cover the costs and financial losses incurred.

Yes, as a tenant, you are legally required to pay rent until the end of the tenancy agreement or any release clause agreed.   A tenancy agreement is signed by both tenant and landlord and it is legally binding.   As the tenant you need to read it carefully as the duration of the tenancy is stated (the minimum length of time you agree to rent for), how much rent to pay, tenant responsibilities, tenant rights and landlord responsibilities.   In other circumstances, your landlord may agree to end the tenancy earlier, but will expect you cover the costs and financial losses incurred.

A tenant must use a rented property solely for residential purposes.   A tenant must not run a business of any kind or you may put the landlord in breach of local by-laws.

Rent cannot be increased during a contracted term.   That is to say, if you sign a 12 month tenancy agreement with us, the rent cannot be increased during that 12 month contracted period.

All of our tenancy agreements require that the rent is paid in full in one single monthly payment for the entire property.   Payments should be made by bank transfer and must carry the property reference code which is supplied by base at the start of your tenancy.

You will need to set up a standing order to leave your account 10 days before the due date so that it has plenty of time to clear.   The 10 days allows for weekends, bank holidays and extended holiday periods so that you are never late.   Your rent must be cleared by the due date in accordance with your tenancy agreement to avoid any late payment charges and your account falling into arrears.